Troski attempts to revive local kwaito music

05 Nov 2010

Just when the Botswana music industry thought Kwaito music had died a slow death, out came Troski, the local industry’s version of South Africa’s Mandoza.

Troski’s stage name was not inspired by anything in particular; his real name is Michael Molefe.
Signed under Snare Fudge Productions,Troski recently held a successful listening session for his first project. The album was well received.

The young artist said that his album was his first full project after some failed attempts in the past.

He said his album is educational, enjoyable and funky. His record label, Snarefudge, is said to be made up of a group of young men and women with a passion for music.

“I won’t tell you how many years I have been in the industry because I have been here for years, even kwasa kwasa star, Franco, found me on the scene. If it wasn’t for Snare Fudge I would still be struggling to find a record label,” said Troski.

Like many other local performing artists, Troski is not disillusioned by the fact that there is not much money in the local music industry, if there ever was any. He has a day job that he wants to balance with his music to make ends meet.

Troski’s album, which has impressive beats, was worked on by three young men by the names of Tshepho Molokwena and Francois Titus as well as Phineas Moagi.

On his songs, he collaborates with different artists such as Mosako, Esko and Tbo-touch. He said that the album is creative because it features songs, such as Tla ke e tsenye, which he says refers to one’s favorite songs. He said that girls are always talking about their favourite songs and he came up with that concept because he knew it was ambiguous.

Another song he particularly likes is a track called Now I Know How It Tastes, which he said he came up with to refer to success, how he yearned for it and how it feels to finally experience it.
His record company is planning the launch of the album as well as a music video for the artist in the near future.