Saturday, September 25, 2021

Good rainy season expected in Botswana

The Department of Meteorological Services (DMS) has forecast normal to above normal rainfall in the coming 2021 – 2022 cropping season over most parts of the country. The rainfall season starts in a few weeks in October and will end in March 2022. 

According to the DMS, the first half of the season which runs from October to December will see most parts of the country experiencing normal to above rainfall except the southwest district. Temperatures for the first half of the season are also expected to be normal to above normal, says DMS.

It is more of the same for the second half of the rainfall season which runs from January to March 2022 as most parts of the country are expected to receive normal to above normal rains, while the northern parts will receive above normal rainfall. DMS also notes that temperatures will be normal with a tendency to below over most areas.

The seasonal rainfall outlook is regarded as a critical planning tool which assists farmers to choose the right crops to plant. Meanwhile, climate experts from the southern African region say the SADC region is anticipated to receive normal to above normal rainfall in the coming 2021 – 2022 cropping season.

A statement released at the end of the 25th annual Southern Africa Climate Outlook Forum (SARCOF), notes that north-western part of Angola, bulk of Democratic Republic of Congo, western and southern Madagascar, northern Malawi, northern Mozambique, western fringes of Namibia and South Africa, south-western United Republic of Tanzania and north-eastern Zambia likely to receive normal to below-normal rains.

According to the DMS, the purpose of the rainfall and temperature outlook is for it to be used for the benefit of policymaking decisions in the climate sensitive sectors for socio-economic purposes as well as to manage risk arising from climate variability and climate change.

“The outlook is relevant only for seasonal time scale and relatively large areas. Local and month-to-month variations might occur as the season progresses,” states DMS.

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