Tuesday, October 19, 2021

Magosi lands cushy job at SADC

Former Permanent Secretary (PS) at the Ministry of Transport and Communications Elias Magosi, who recently quit his job at the Government Enclave, has found a lucrative job at the South African Development Community (SADC). 

Before the past immediate job as Communications Ministry PS, Magosi served under the same portfolio at the Ministry of Environment, Natural Resources Conservation and Tourism headed by Tshekedi Khama. 

Sunday Standard has been informed that Magosi has since joined SADC headquarters in Gaborone as the Director Human Resources and Administration soon after quitting the civil service. 

On December 1, 2016, Magosi was number one on the list of appointments and transfers of senior public officers which was announced by Permanent Secretary to the President (PSP) and Secretary to Cabinet Carter Morupisi. 

Magosi accepted the offer and then resigned within one month last December.

The SADC Directorate of Human Resources and Administration which Magosi is now heading was established following the restructuring of SADC in February 2008, with emphasis placed on the need to improve service delivery within the SADC Secretariat. 

The Directorate is said to play a pivotal role in the provision of services that support fulfilment of the SADC Secretariat key mandate towards  regional integration and socio-economic development.

According to information from the SADC website, successful execution of the SADC Secretariat corporate strategy requires an integrated human resource management and administration strategy that is capable of meeting the ever-changing logistical, documentation, competency and skills requirements.

At SADC, Magosi is now reporting to SADC Executive Secretary, Dr Stergomena Lawrence Tax, and a national of Tanzania. She is the sixth and first female Executive Secretary of SADC. 

Within SADC has 15 member countries with a population of approximately 250 million people and a combined GDP of USD 467.3 billion (2006).  

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