Friday, January 22, 2021

Comedians ‘made them laugh’ at Kwest Cafe

Local comedians had a field day, throwing zingers and one liners to the audience who were kept in laughter throughout the show at Kwest cafe over the weekend as Botswana joined the rest of the world to celebrate the International Comedy day.

The comedians proved that cajoling and ridiculing others is big business and entertainment that people love.

Modiri┬á “MOD”┬áKeseabetswe’s┬áutterances were as if they were meant to ridicule visiting female South African comedian, Khanyisa Bunu, when he emphasized that she was “able to compete in a male dominated industry┬á though she doesn’t have balls”.

He said that though in Botswana comedians are only males, there is a greater opportunity  for women. 

“It is our belief that this can only be done by man but women have the potential,” he added.
Keseabetswe’s alluring jokes kept the audience alive when he took the ┬ástage. ┬á

His and other comedians’ jokes were centered┬áon politics and individual behaviours.

The audience kept on asking for more as comedians who came on the stage impressed with spellbinding jokes.

Comedians hit President Ian Kgama, Phandu Skelemani, Kenneth Matambo, common political statements and┬áon Jacob Zuma’s polygamist lifestyle and the audience loved it.

In one of his jokes, Keseabetswe noted how Khama tried to convince Francistown residents during a kgotla meeting to cut and plant Mophane trees in their back yard gardens.

 According to the comedian this was one of the meetings that the president was trying to encourage people to use back yard gardening.

He said, “The residents were shocked to learn that the President wanted them to plant Mophane trees to increase the number of Mophane worms that is mostly loved by the Kalangas.”

The comedian went on with his impressive jokes as he thanked the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Phandu┬á Skelemani, “for convincing the Zimbabwean government to buy cattle infected with Foot and Mouth Disease”. He wondered what President Ian Khama┬áwould sound like in trying to convince Batswana to eat FMD infected cattle.

“O ta abo o kgaola dinao o bo o di latha akere. A kere dinao ke tsone di nang le foot and mouth. Go tswa ho o bo o kgaola thogo o bo o e latha. Jaanong o ka ja nama ya teng,” said Keseabetse, sending the audience into laugher.

Keabetswe suggested that Khama would convince Batswana to eat FMD infected cattle by cutting off the cattle’s feet and heads “because these are some of the parts that have foot and mouth disease”.

Keseabetswe also expressed his love for Indians, telling the audience about how the Indians are good at negotiating.

He said that they can even haggle down school fees for their children at a private school.
He said that the Indian man suggested a reduction in school fees since he was going to have his son take Mathematics and Setswana lessons at home rather than at the school.

Serowe-born comedian, known as “The Good ‘n’ the Bad” ┬ádisagreed with the notion that Khama is a populist.┬á

“If Khama was a populist, he could have popularized┬á his Afro style in Serowe. Believe me, if Khama was a populist I could be having an afro,” he said.

The comedian also noted his love for bald people.

He said that more bald people get more loans in most local banks than those with full head of hair, adding that even the Minister of Finance, Kenneth Matambo, who is bald, is entrusted with the responsibility of looking after public funds.  

“Just because he is bald he was given such responsibility to look after the public funds,” he noted.
The comedian┬áheld that Matambo’s role is an indication of how the bald people are┬áin control when it comes to money.

He went on to explain that he loves bald people because they help to conserve shampoo better than those with Afros.

“Bald people’s shampoo lasts longer,” he quipped.

When she took to the stage, South African comedienne, Khanyisa Bulu, declared her love for Botswana.  

She said that, as a Bible reader, she is encouraged by the Scriptures “to love thy neighbour”.
“That is why I love Botswana. They are my neighbours. The Bible says love your neighbour ┬áand Botswana is my neighbour, that is why I am here today. I am so much in love with this country because I understand it is one of the wealthy countries.┬á That is the only country where you will find people running errands with baskets as they try to catch Pula falling from skies,” said Bulu.
In one of her Jokes, Bulu also explained that she was not a racist because she has never participated in any comrade marathon race.

She said as a black person she has found out that the blacks have no privacy.

“When I grew up, I never went to a private school but I went to a public school. When I am sick I don’t go to a private hospital but I go to public hospital. When I want to go for shopping, I use public transport rather than being chauffeured in a private car. When I arrived in Botswana, I first enquired about public toilets. As long as you are black there is no privacy and you are only obsessed with things that are public,” Busu said to booming laughter.

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